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Five ways to prepare the perfect connected class

Running a perfect connected class requires a lot of training.

“When I came into the classroom and saw my friends—some in the room and some on the screen—it felt like all of us were there,” says Clemens, smiling.

The gathering, part face-to-face and part virtual, aimed to familiarize students and teachers with “hybrid” instruction, which the choir school will implement at the start of the 2020-21 academic year. The integration of the two modalities will help “de-densify” classrooms and safeguard health while ensuring the personal approach to learning that is central to the SPCS educational experience.

“I truly felt like I was there,” says Chris, 13, who participated remotely. “You could see the whole class, watch the teacher move in the room and write on the blackboard. And the teacher often directly addressed me and my friends who were online.”

For teachers, the key is to provide learning experiences of richness and rigor for all students, whether they are six feet or six miles away. “To be engaged, students need to be able to express themselves,” says Patrick Moran, a social studies teacher at SPCS. “The ones logging in from home can’t just be blocks on a Zoom screen, they have to be full participants. You have to make eye contact with them through the camera and give them something interesting and engaging to look at. Finally, you have to make sure that they can ask questions, give answers to exercises, and interact with their peers”.

The gathering, part face-to-face and part virtual, aimed to familiarize students and teachers with “hybrid” instruction, which the choir school will implement at the start of the 2020-21 academic year. The integration of the two modalities will help “de-densify” classrooms and safeguard health while ensuring the personal approach to learning that is central to the SPCS educational experience.

“I truly felt like I was there,” says Chris, 13, who participated remotely. “You could see the whole class, watch the teacher move in the room and write on the blackboard. And the teacher often directly addressed me and my friends who were online.”

For teachers, the key is to provide learning experiences of richness and rigor for all students, whether they are six feet or six miles away. “To be engaged, students need to be able to express themselves,” says Patrick Moran, a social studies teacher at SPCS. “The ones logging in from home can’t just be blocks on a Zoom screen, they have to be full participants. You have to make eye contact with them through the camera and give them something interesting and engaging to look at. Finally, you have to make sure that they can ask questions, give answers to exercises, and interact with their peers”.